Skip to main content

What will I learn?

Make beauty your business. When you’re accepted into JCCC’s School of Cosmetology, you’ll be trained to exceed expectations and deliver a look that's right for each of your clients. The hands-on classroom and salon clinic experience will prepare you for industry success as a licensed cosmetologist, esthetician or nail technologist.

Build the technical and soft skills you need to successfully pass your Kansas State Board of Cosmetology License exam:

  • In-depth, hands-on training in hair, skin and nail services
  • Extensive test prep for the Kansas Board of Cosmetology Licensing exam
  • Valuable real-world experience at JCCC’s full-service salon
  • Experience working in a Certified Green Circle Salon

Choose your area:

Cosmetology ­– full-time

  • 16 students
  • 1,500 contact hours
  • 45 credit hours
  • 40 hours a week

Learn how to:

  • Perform a variety of haircuts
  • Formulate and apply hair color 
  • Chemically straighten and texturize hair

Esthetics – part- or full-time

  • 14 students
  • 1,000 contact hours
  • 46 credit hours
  • 20 hours a week (part time/4 semesters)
  • 40 hours a week (full time/2 semesters)

Learn how to:

  • Perform a skin analysis
  • Determine the client’s skin type
  • Identify and treat a variety of skin issues
  • Perform specialized facial massage, cleansing and exfoliation
  • Apply makeup
  • Use light therapy and hair removal methods including laser

Nail Technology – full time

  • 8 students
  • 1 summer session
  • 350 contact hours
  • 16 credit hours
  • 40 hours a week

Learn how to apply nail polish, acrylic tips and ornamental designs.

Why JCCC?

Our experience:

  • Instructors are licensed practitioners, master colorists and highly trained in the latest esthetics and nail technology techniques. A variety of small business and fashion classes will give you even more career options.
  • Pass rates are 89 percent for the Kansas Board of Cosmetology License exam.
  • Our selective admission program is internationally recognized by Pivot Point, a leader in beauty education curriculum.
  • An 11-member Cosmetology Advisory Board of salon owners and industry professionals updates our students on the latest trends and retail ideas, and helps with JCCC’s annual fashion show.

Our commitment to your success:

  • The 45 credits you earn in Cosmetology can go toward an associate degree.
  • Enrollment is twice a year, not every month, which means you’ll train with the same group of classmates from your program’s start to the finish line.
  • Get career advice, support to overcome test anxiety, and help writing an effective résumé through our student resource services.
  • Serving others is part of our philosophy. Every April the salon is exclusively open to the Down Syndrome Guild and offers free hair, skin and nail services for prom.

Our affordability: On average, JCCC is half the price of other metro cosmetology schools.

Learn more about our Cosmetology, Esthetics or Nail Technology programs at monthly information sessions. 

This program requires department approval. See how to apply

Overall employment of barbers, cosmetologists, and other personal appearance workers is projected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2021. However, competition is expected for jobs and clients at higher paying salons as applicants compete with a large pool of licensed and experienced cosmetologists for these positions.

Opportunities will be best for those with previous experience and for those licensed to provide a broad range of services. Employment of hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists should grow faster because many now cut and style both men’s and women’s hair and because the demand for hair treatment by teens and aging baby boomers is expected to remain steady or even grow. Continued growth in the number of nail salons and full-service day spas will generate numerous job openings for manicurists, pedicurists, and skin care specialists. Estheticians and other skin care specialists will see large gains in employment and are expected to grow as more facial procedures to improve one’s complexion become available and become more popular in spas and some medical settings.

Employment Information

Greater Kansas City Area: In 2016, those in the cosmetology field held an estimated 10,211 jobs in the fifteen counties that make up the Kansas City Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), with 11,381 projected by 2021 (+11.5%). Of those, 7,308 are hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists (8,134 projected, +11%), 1,498 were manicurists and pedicurists (1,727 projected, +15%). Additionally, 649 were skin care specialists (737 projected, +14%) and 755 were barbers (783 projected, +4%).

State: In Kansas, those in the cosmetology field held an estimated 12,271 jobs in 2016, with 13,383 jobs projected by 2021 (+9.1%). Of those, 9,182 were hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists (9,907 projected, +8%); 1,484 manicurists and pedicurists (1,728 projected, +16%); 785 skin care specialists (887 projected, +13%); and 819 barbers (861 projected, +5%). Approximately 1,112 openings in the cosmetology field are expected due to growth and the need for replacement workers.

National: About 1,644,998 jobs were held in the cosmetology field in 2016 with 1,864,231 jobs projected by 2021 (+13.3%). Of those, 1,117,726 were hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists (1,258,589 projected, +13%); 253,243 were manicurists and pedicurists (295,486 projected, +17%); 117,912 were skin care specialists (135,098 projected, +15%); and 156,117 were barbers (175,058 projected, +12% increase). Approximately 219,233 openings are expected due to growth and the need for replacement workers.

Salary Information

Greater Kansas City Area: Hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists employed in the Greater Kansas City area earned an average hourly wage of $11.70 in 2016, while manicurists and pedicurists earned $9.02 per hour. Additionally, skin care specialists earned $13.89 per hour and barbers earned $11.56.

State: Hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists in Kansas earned an average hourly wage of $11.25 in 2016, and manicurists and pedicurists earned $8.77 per hour. Furthermore, skin care specialists earned $12.15 per hour, and barbers earned $11.29.

National: Hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists working full-time earned an average hourly wage of $11.26 in 2016, while manicurists and pedicurists earned $9.49 per hour. In addition, skin care specialists earned $13.93 per hour, and barbers earned $10.69.

JCCC Placement and Salary Information

The JCCC Office of Institutional Research conducts a follow-up study of program completers one year after completion. Ninety-two percent of the graduates who responded to the follow-up study conducted during 2015-16, and were employed, were employed in a related field and reported earning an average hourly wage of $24.91.


Need help with career decisions? Visit the Career Development Center.

Money matters. JCCC is working hard to make tuition affordable for you.

Here’s what we offer:

Supplies and textbook costs vary depending on your classes.